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dc.contributor.authorWhannel, Garryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T08:38:58Z
dc.date.available2013-07-03T08:38:58Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationWhannel, G. (2009) 'Television and the transformation of sport', The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 625 (1), pp.205-218.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0002-7162
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0002716209339144
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/295131
dc.description.abstractSport played a significant part in the growth of television, especially during its emergence as a dominant global medium between 1960 and 1980. In turn, television, together with commercial sponsorship, transformed sport, bringing it significant new income and prompting changes in rules, presentation, and cultural form. Increasingly, from the 1970s, it was not the regular weekly sport that commanded the largest audiences but, rather, the occasional major events, such as the Olympic Games and football’s World Cup. In the past two decades, deregulation and digitalization have expanded the number of channels, but this fragmentation, combined with the growth of the Internet, has meant that the era in which shared domestic leisure was dominated by viewing of the major channels is closing. Yet, sport provides an exception, an instance when around the world millions share a live and unpredictable viewing experience.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Journalsen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://ann.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0002716209339144en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Scienceen_GB
dc.subjectsporten_GB
dc.subjectOlympic gamesen_GB
dc.subjectfootballen_GB
dc.titleTelevision and the transformation of sporten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Scienceen_GB
html.description.abstractSport played a significant part in the growth of television, especially during its emergence as a dominant global medium between 1960 and 1980. In turn, television, together with commercial sponsorship, transformed sport, bringing it significant new income and prompting changes in rules, presentation, and cultural form. Increasingly, from the 1970s, it was not the regular weekly sport that commanded the largest audiences but, rather, the occasional major events, such as the Olympic Games and football’s World Cup. In the past two decades, deregulation and digitalization have expanded the number of channels, but this fragmentation, combined with the growth of the Internet, has meant that the era in which shared domestic leisure was dominated by viewing of the major channels is closing. Yet, sport provides an exception, an instance when around the world millions share a live and unpredictable viewing experience.


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