• “Hard to reach, but not out of reach”: barriers and facilitators to recruiting Black African and Black Caribbean men with prostate cancer and their partners into qualitative research

      Bamidele, Olufikayo; McGarvey, Helen E.; Lagan, Briege M.; Chinegwundoh, Frank; Ali, Nasreen; McCaughan, Ellis; Ulster University; Barts Health NHS Trust; City University of London; University of Bedfordshire (Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2018-12-12)
      Access and recruitment barriers may have contributed to the underrepresentation of Black African/Caribbean men and their partners in current psychosocial research related to prostate cancer survivors. Whilst some studies have explored recruitment barriers and facilitators from participants’ perspectives, little is known from researchers' point of view. This paper aimed to address this gap in the literature. Recruitment strategies included the following: cancer support groups, researchers’ networks, media advertisement, religious organisations, National Health Service hospitals and snowball sampling. Thirty-six eligible participants (men = 25, partners = 11) were recruited into the study. Recruitment barriers comprised of gate-keeping and advertisement issues and the stigma associated with prostate cancer disclosure. Facilitators which aided recruitment included collaborating with National Health Service hospitals, snowball sampling, flexible data collection, building rapport with participants to gain their trust and researcher's attributes. Findings highlight that “hard to reach” Black African/Caribbean populations may be more accessible if researchers adopt flexible but strategic and culturally sensitive recruitment approaches. Such approaches should consider perceptions of stigma associated with prostate cancer within these communities and the influence gatekeepers can have in controlling access to potential participants. Increased engagement with healthcare professionals and gatekeepers could facilitate better access to Black African/Caribbean populations so that their voices can be heard and their specific needs addressed within the healthcare agenda.
    • Life after prostate cancer: a systematic literature review and thematic synthesis of the post-treatment experiences of Black African and Black Caribbean men

      Bamidele, Olufikayo; McGarvey, Helen E.; Lagan, Briege M.; Ali, Nasreen; Chinegwundoh, Frank; Parahoo, K.; McCaughan, Ellis (Wiley, 2017-10-16)
      Evidence shows that there are significant ethnic variations in prostate cancer prevalence and outcomes. Specifically, Black African and Black Caribbean men may encounter different post-treatment experiences than Caucasian men due to their disproportionately higher risk of being diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer. But to date, no review of these experiences has been undertaken. This review synthesised findings from existing literature on the post-treatment experiences of Black African and Black Caribbean men with prostate cancer and identified pertinent issues which may be useful to inform practice and future research. Seven databases were systematically searched using developed search terms. Four qualitative studies were identified and critically appraised. Findings are summarised under four main themes: symptom experience, healthcare experience, marital and social relationships and coping strategies. Cultural definitions of masculinity influenced the meanings men gave to their post-treatment experiences. While men's experiences of healthcare varied, the provision of professional support to address their post-treatment distress was lacking. Men derived most support from wives, peers and church communities. A culturally sensitive approach which recognises diversity among Black African and Black Caribbean populations and treats individuals within their religious and socio-cultural contexts could potentially improve men's post-treatment experiences. Areas for further research were also identified.