• Gaming enhances learning-induced plastic changes in the brain

      Junttila, Katja; Smolander, Anna-Riikka; Karhila, Reima; Giannakopoulou, Anastasia; Uther, Maria; Kurimo, Mikko; Ylinen, Sari; University of Helsinki; Tampere University; University of Bedfordshire; et al. (Elsevier, 2022-04-26)
      Digital games may benefit children's learning, yet the factors that induce gaming benefits to cognition are not well known. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of digital game-based learning in children by comparing the learning of foreign speech sounds and words in a digital game or a non-game digital application. To evaluate gaming-induced plastic changes in the brain, we used the mismatch negativity (MMN) brain response that reflects the access to long-term memory representations. We recorded auditory brain responses from 37 school-aged Finnish-speaking children before and after playing a computer-based language-learning game. The MMN amplitude increased between the pre- and post-measurement for the game condition but not for the non-game condition, suggesting that the gaming intervention enhanced learning more than the non-game intervention. The results indicate that digital games can be beneficial for children's speech-sound learning and that gaming elements per se, not just practice time, support learning.
    • Mentoring at times of crises: personal reflections on mentoring relationships during COVID-19

      Wassif, Hoda; Wake, Charlotte; University of Bedfordshire (Wiley, 2022-05-06)
      COVID-19 presented a huge challenge for practice, education and all interactions, and mentorship was no different. The purpose of this commentary is to reflect on the juxtaposition between mentors and mentees in dental education during COVID-19. This commentary will focus on the interaction between mentor/mentee outside clinical practice and in relation to supporting and mentoring dental practitioners in the context of postgraduate education. The aim is to share our learning from this experience with other dental educators beyond COVID-19.
    • Genomic insights into recent species divergence in Nicotiana benthamiana and natural variation in Rdr1 gene controlling viral susceptibility.

      Cauz-Santos, Luiz A.; Dodsworth, Steven; Samuel, Rosabelle; Christenhusz, Maarten J.M.; Patel, Denise; Shittu, Taiwo Adewale; Jakob, Aljaž; Paun, Ovidiu; Chase, Mark W.; ; et al. (Wiley, 2022-05-10)
      One of the most commonly encountered and frequently cited laboratory organisms worldwide is classified taxonomically as Nicotiana benthamiana (Solanaceae), an accession of which, typically referred to as LAB, is renowned for its unique susceptibility to a wide range of plant viruses and hence capacity to be transformed using a variety of methods. This susceptibility is the result of an insertion and consequent loss of function in the RNA dependent RNA polymerase 1 (Rdr1) gene. However, the origin and age of LAB and evolution of N. benthamiana across its wide distribution in Australia remains relatively underexplored. Here, we have used multispecies coalescent methods on genome-wide single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) to assess species limits, phylogenetic relationships and divergence times within N. benthamiana. Our results show that the previous taxonomic concept of this species in fact comprises five geographically, morphologically and genetically distinct species, one of which includes LAB. We provide clear evidence that LAB is closely related to accessions collected further north in the Northern Territory; this species split much earlier, c. 1.1 million years ago, from their common ancestor than the other four in this clade and is morphologically the most distinctive. We also found that the Rdr1 gene insertion is variable among accessions from the northern portions of the Northern Territory. Furthermore, this long-isolated species typically grows in sheltered sites in subtropical/tropical monsoon areas of northern Australia, contradicting the previously advanced hypothesis that this species is an extremophile that has traded viral resistance for precocious development.
    • A philosophical inquiry into subject English and creative writing

      Belas, Oliver (Routledge, 2022-05-10)
      Table of Contents Part I: Aims & Scope of the Book Chapter 1 Writing in, about, & from the Classroom Chapter 2 Mapping the Terrain of Schooled English & Creative Writing Part II: Problems of Knowledge Chapter 3 Problems of Individual Knowledge Chapter 4 Problems of Curricular & Disciplinary Knowledge: The Curious Case of School English Chapter 5 Reading, Writing, & a Very Rough Sketch of Revised English Studies (Coda to Part II) Part III: Writing Beyond the English Studies Classroom Chapter 6 Thinking as a Kind of Writing, Writing as a Kind of Philosophy; or, On Lightbulb Moments
    • A commentary on soccer match-play simulations for applied research and practice

      Field, Adam C.; Harper, Liam D.; Aldous, Jeffrey William Frederick; Page, Richard M. (Taylor and Francis Online, 2022-05-09)
      Soccer is a fast-growing area of research, demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in the number of PubMed articles derived from the search term ‘soccer’ between 2001 and 2021. The scope of contemporary soccer related articles ranges from match-play observations to laboratory evaluations of performance. The activity profile of soccer match-play is variable and techniques to collect data within matches are limited. Soccer-specific simulations have been developed to simulate the evolving demands of match-play. The evolutionary designs of novel simulations provide a reproducible exercise stimulus for varying researcher and practitioner objectives. The applied researcher can utilise simulations to investigate the efficacy of nutritional interventions and environmental stress on performance, while assessing the physiological and biomechanical responses to representations of match-play. Practitioners can adopt simulations for rehabilitation to progressively facilitate return-to-play processes, while implementing extra top-up conditioning sessions for unused and partial-match players. However, there are complexities involved with the selection of varying simulations which are dependent on the research question or practical application. There also remains a paucity of published information to support researchers and practitioners in selecting from differing simulation models. To assist with researcher and practitioner interpretations, we present a commentary of the current simulations to inform decision-making processes for research and training purposes and enhance the application of future research. An objective scoring system was adopted for rating the research and practical applications of each simulation design. Overall scores of 22, 16 and 18 out of 36 were revealed for free-running (n = 7), non-motorised- (n = 4) and motorisedtreadmill-based simulations (n = 4), respectively.
    • Growing sideways: re-articulating ontologies of childhood within/through relationships and sexuality education (RSE)

      Atkinson, Catherine; Coll, Leanne; McBride, Ruari-Santiago; Whittington, Elsie; Zanatta, Francesca; University of Manchester; Dublin City University; University of Limerick; University of Bedfordshire; University of East London (Wiley, 2022-02-01)
      This article presents a collaborative reflective-thinking-writing project that draws from the authors’ experiences of co-productive and critical inquiry with children in the field of gender, sexualities and education. Integrating our collective concerns regarding how childhood can be negatively framed and policed within/through RSE, we explore how these ontological boundaries might be queered through a collective engagement with the possibilities for/of RSE that is affirmative, playful and co-produced with, rather than for, children.
    • Enacting whole-school relationships and sexuality education in England: context matters

      Bragg, Sara; Ponsford, Ruth; Meiksin, Rebecca; Lohan, Maria; Melendez-Torres, G. J.; Hadley, Alison; Young, Honor; Barter, Christine; Taylor, Bruce; Bonell, Chris; et al. (Wiley, 2022-03-30)
      Evidence from intervention evaluations suggests that achieving meaningful and lasting social, behavioural and attitudinal change from relationships, sex and health education (RSHE) in schools requires more than just a curriculum. Whole-school approaches appear particularly promising since they work at multiple levels. For instance, they may: engage with carers, communities and local services; address iniquitous cultures and norms; change school policies and practices; and actively involve young people themselves. They have also been advocated to tackle sexual harassment and abuse in schools. Currently, however, such approaches have not been rigorously evaluated in the UK. This article focuses on the whole-school elements of two recent RSHE pilot studies conducted in English secondary schools. We describe how these elements were variably enacted in different settings. We analyse contextual factors that help account for these differences, including: teacher and departmental professional identity and autonomy; broader education policy including high-stakes testing and school inspection judgements; the significance of support staff; and staff–student relationships and partnerships. We argue that the likely impact of whole-school approaches and RSHE in schools more generally will depend on attending to all of these factors. The paper contributes firstly to debates about the theory and practice of RSHE by highlighting the significance of processes and cultures beyond the classroom in enabling or constraining positive change. Secondly it contributes to scholarship that elucidates the role of contexts, broadly defined, in understanding the enactment of policy and practice.
    • Editorial: Special issue on "Bright ICT: security, privacy and risk issues"

      Lawrence, Victor B.; Ayaburi, Emmanuel W.; Andoh-Baidoo, Francis Kofi; Dwivedi, Yogesh Kumar; Lal, Banita (Springer, 2022-04-02)
      Bright ICT, a 2015 initiative of the Association of Information Systems introduced by Prof J.K. Lee, refers to the grand vision of a bright society enabled by ICT. Bright ICT research involves taking a holistic view at the design of ICT enabled future society (Lee, 2016; Lee et al., 2018). This concept entails the development of relevant technologies, business models, public policies, social norms, international agreements, metrics for measuring national progress and preventing undesirable activities on the Internet. It is also at the center of discussions on adoption or modification of technologies, policies, and organizations from which new business models—that create a bright safe internet—can evolve. As a double edge sword, technology creates huge benefits such as the use of mobile phones for healthcare access but create challenges such as delayed access to healthcare providers (Haenssgen & Ariana, 2017). Legal frameworks such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and opt-in/out rules that are promulgated to protect individuals’ private data have dual effect of reducing users’ information sharing intentions and giving power to a few Tech market players (Johnson et al., 2020).
    • Review of: Engaging with linguistic diversity: a study of educational inclusion at an Irish primary school

      Mistry, Malini Tina (Taylor and Francis, 2022-04-18)
      review of Engaging with linguistic diversity: a study of educational inclusion at an Irish primary school edited by David Little, Deirdre Kiwan, Victoria Pugh and Daniel Hughes, London, Bloomsbury, 2019, 190 pp., £26.00 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-350-07203-9
    • Book review: Assessing speaking in context: expanding the construct and its applications

      Taylor, Lynda (SAGE, 2022-02-16)
      review of Salaberry MR, Burch AR (2021) Assessing speaking in context: expanding the construct and its applications, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, ISBN 9781788923804
    • Phylogenomic discordance suggests polytomies along the backbone of the large genus Solanum

      Gagnon, Edeline; Hilgenhof, Rebecca; Orejuela, Andrés; McDonnell, Angela J.; Sablok, Gaurav; Aubriot, Xavier; Giacomin, Leandro; Gouvêa, Yuri; Bragionis, Thamyris; Stehmann, João Renato; et al. (John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2022-04-18)
      Premise: Evolutionary studies require solid phylogenetic frameworks, but increased volumes of phylogenomic data have revealed incongruent topologies among gene trees in many organisms both between and within genomes. Some of these incongruences indicate polytomies that may remain impossible to resolve. Here we investigate the degree of gene-tree discordance in Solanum, one of the largest flowering plant genera that includes the cultivated potato, tomato, and eggplant, as well as 24 minor crop plants. Methods: A densely sampled species-level phylogeny of Solanum is built using unpublished and publicly available Sanger sequences comprising 60% of all accepted species (742 spp.) and nine regions (ITS, waxy, and seven plastid markers). The robustness of this topology is tested by examining a full plastome dataset with 140 species and a nuclear target-capture dataset with 39 species of Solanum (Angiosperms353 probe set). Results: While the taxonomic framework of Solanum remained stable, gene tree conflicts and discordance between phylogenetic trees generated from the target-capture and plastome datasets were observed. The latter correspond to regions with short internodal branches, and network analysis and polytomy tests suggest the backbone is composed of three polytomies found at different evolutionary depths. The strongest area of discordance, near the crown node of Solanum, could potentially represent a hard polytomy. Conclusions: We argue that incomplete lineage sorting due to rapid diversification is the most likely cause for these polytomies, and that embracing the uncertainty that underlies them is crucial to understand the evolution of large and rapidly radiating lineages.
    • Beliefs about food allergies in adolescents aged 11–19 years: a systematic review

      Newman, Kristina; Chater, Angel M.; Knibb, Rebecca C.; ; Aston University; University of Bedfordshire; Nottingham Trent University (John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2022-04-06)
      Aims: Research suggests of people with food allergy (FA), adolescents have the highest risk of fatal allergic reactions to food, yet understanding of this population and how they manage their condition is limited. Understanding beliefs and how they affect behaviour could inform ways to reduce risk taking behaviour and fatal reactions in adolescents. This systematic review aimed to explore beliefs adolescents hold about their FA, and how these may be associated with FA management. Demographics: Adolescents aged 11–19 years with FA. Methodology: A systematic search of seven databases was conducted. Papers of any design were included that reported on the beliefs about FA in adolescents aged 11–19 years. Data was systemised by narrative thematic analysis. Findings: 20 studies were included. Themes included navigating FA in different environments, carriage and use of adrenaline auto-injectors, management of the risk of anaphylaxis, behaviour and understanding of others, and food-allergic identity. Implications: Adolescents with FA hold a variety of condition beliefs; some beliefs were related to behaviour that could lead to an allergic reaction, while other beliefs were related to protective behaviours. Further research into understanding adolescent beliefs in order to inform clinical management and reduce the risk of potential fatal reactions is essential.
    • Learning from safeguarding adult reviews about Transitional Safeguarding: building an evidence base

      Preston-Shoot, Michael; Cocker, Christine; Cooper, Adi; University of Bedfordshire; University of East Anglia; Adult Social Care and Safeguarding (Emerald Group Holdings Ltd., 2022-04-12)
      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to set out the evidence base to date for Transitional Safeguarding to support authors of Safeguarding Adult Reviews (SARs) where Transitional Safeguarding is a key theme in the review. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on key evidence from several published sources about Transitional Safeguarding in England. This evidence is presented in this paper as a framework for analysis to support SAR authors. It follows the same four domains framework used in other adult safeguarding reviews: direct work with individuals; team around the person; organisational support for team members; and governance. This framework was then applied to two SARs written by two of the article’s authors. Findings: The framework for analysis for Transitional Safeguarding SARs was applied as part of the methodology of two separate SARs regarding three young people. Key reflections from applying the framework to both SARs are identified and discussed. These included: providing an effective framework for analysis which all participants could use and a contribution for developing knowledge. Whilst many issues arising for safeguarding young people are similar to those for other adults, there are some unique features. The ways in which the gaps between children and adults systems play out through inter-agency and multi-professional working, as well as how “lifestyle choices” of young people are understood and interpreted are key issues. Practical implications: This paper presents an evidence base regarding Transitional Safeguarding for SAR authors who are tasked with completing a SAR where Transitional Safeguarding is a key theme. Originality/value: This paper draws together key literature and evidence about Transitional Safeguarding practice with young people. This paper argues that this framework for analysis provides SAR authors with a useful tool to support their analysis in this complex area of practice.
    • Sustainable arts and health: the role of a university in facilitating an intergenerational, interdisciplinary community arts project

      Farrer, Rachel; Douse, Louise Emma; Aujla, Imogen; University of Bedfordshire (University of Georgia, 2022-03-31)
      There is growing interest in the use of intergenerational practice in arts and health to support psychological well-being and community cohesion. However, little research has addressed the facilitation of such projects, or how higher education institutions can support them. Here we examine the role of the University of Bedfordshire in Generations Dancing, an 11-week dance and photography project for older adults and young people in Bedford. Focus groups were conducted with the older adults, young people, artists, independent living centre leaders, and schoolteachers involved. Inductive content analysis highlighted the university’s role in brokering between community sectors, promoting the project, and offering resources. These factors appeared to play a significant part in enabling the project to develop beyond what smaller organizations working independently might have achieved, and in facilitating a sustainable model for its perpetuation.
    • Workplace intervention for reducing sitting time in sedentary workers: protocol for a pilot study using the Behavior Change Wheel

      Ojo, Samson Oluseye; Bailey, Daniel Paul; Chater, Angel M.; Hewson, David; University of Bedfordshire; Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust; Brunel University; University College London (Frontiers, 2022-04-12)
      The workplace is a major contributor to excessive sitting in office workers. There are a wide array of adverse effects of high volumes of sitting time, including an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and depression. Active workstations can be used in effective interventions to decrease workplace sitting. However, there are a lack of interventions that have been developed using a systematic process that is informed by participant needs and a framework for identifying the most appropriate content for the intervention. Applying these methods could increase adherence and potential effectiveness of the intervention. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study is to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a tailored workplace intervention to reduce and break up sitting in office workers that has been developed using the Behavior Change Wheel and the APEASE (Acceptability, Practicability, Effectiveness/cost-effectiveness, Affordability, Safety/side-effects, Equity) criteria. This article reports the protocol for this study that is currently ongoing. Participants will be cluster-randomized (by offices) to control and intervention groups. The evaluation of the intervention includes determining feasibility by assessing participant recruitment, retention and data completion rates. Adherence to the intervention will be assessed based on daily sitting and standing time relative to guidelines provided to participants as part of the intervention. Outcome measures also include productivity measured using Ecological Momentary Assessment, absenteeism, presenteeism, cardiometabolic risk markers, and wellbeing. The findings of this study will inform the effective design and implementation of interventions for reducing and breaking up sitting in office workers.
    • Exploring the potential benefits of Ethanol Direct Injection (EDI) timing and pressure on particulate emission characteristics in a Dual-Fuel Spark Ignition (DFSI) engine

      Li, Xiang; Li, Dayou; Liu, Jingyin; Ajmal, Tahmina; Aitouche, Abdel; Mobasheri, Raouf; Rybdylova, Oyuna; Pei, Yiqiang; Peng, Zhijun; ; et al. (Elsevier, 2022-04-26)
      Nowadays, particulate matter emitted by vehicles severely impacts environmental quality and human health. In this paper, the potential benefits of Ethanol Direct Injection (EDI) timing and pressure on particulate emission characteristics in a Dual-Fuel Spark Ignition (DFSI) engine were initially and systematically explored. The experimental results illustrate that by delaying EDI timing from -340 ºCA to -300 ºCA, there is a significant benefit in both particulate number and mass concentration. Furthermore, the size distribution curve of particulate number changes from bimodal to unimodal, meantime size distribution curves of particulate mass consistently concentrate on the accumulation mode. By increasing EDI pressure from 5.5 MPa to 18 MPa, the droplet size of ethanol spray can be effectively reduced. The benefit of increasing EDI pressure is more apparent in reducing particulate number is than particulate mass. The concentration of number and mass for total particulates have a reduction of 51.15% and 22.64%, respectively. In summary, it was demonstrated that an appropriate EDI timing or high EDI pressure could be a practical and efficient way to reduce particulate emissions in a DFSI engine.
    • ER stress in COVID-19 and Parkinson's Disease: in vitro and in silico evidences

      Chaudhry, Zahara Latif; Gamal, Mahmoud; Ferhati, Ingrid; Warda, Mohamad; Ahmed, Bushra Y.; ; University of Bedfordshire; Cairo University (MDPI, 2022-04-16)
      The outbreak of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) signifies a serious worldwide concern to public health. Both transcriptome and proteome of SARS-CoV-2-infected cells synergize the progression of infection in host, which may exacerbate symptoms and/or progression of other chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress is a well-known cause of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress observed in both SARS-CoV-2 and PD. In the current study, we aimed to explore the influence of PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) stress pathway under SARS-CoV-2-mediated infection and in human cell model of PD. Furthermore, we investigated whether they are interconnected and if the ER stress inhibitors could inhibit cell death and provide cellular protection. To achieve this aim, we have incorporated in silico analysis obtained from gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), a literature review and laboratory data. The neurotoxin, 6-hydroxy dopamine (6OHDA), was used to mimic the biochemical and neuropathological characteristics of PD by inducing oxidative stress in dopamine-containing neurons differentiated from ReNVM cell line (dDCNs). Furthermore, we explored if ER stress influences activation of caspases-2, -4 and -8 in SARS-CoV-2 and in stressed dDCNs. Our laboratory data using Western blot, immunocytochemistry and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analyses indicated that 6OHDA-induced toxicity triggered activation of caspases-2, -4 and -8 in dDCNs. Under SARS-CoV-2 infection of different cell types, GSEA revealed cell-specific sensitivities to oxidative and ER stresses. Cardiomyocytes and type II alveolar epithelial-like cells were more vulnerable to oxidative stress than neural cells. On the other side, only cardiomyocytes activated the unfolded protein response, however, the PERK pathway was operative in both cardiomyocytes and neural cells. In addition, caspase-4 activation by a SARS-CoV-2 was observed via in silico analyses. These results demonstrate that the ER stress pathway under oxidative stress in SARS-CoV-2 and PD are interconnected using diverse pathways. Furthermore, our results using the ER stress inhibitor and caspase specific inhibitors provided cellular protection suggesting that the use of specific inhibitors can provide effective therapeutic approaches for the treatment of COVID-19 and PD.
    • Accounting perspectives on the business value ‎of big data during and beyond the Covid-19 ‎pandemic

      Saeudy, Mohamed; Gerged, Ali Meftah; Albitar, Khaldoon; University of Bedfordshire; De Montfort Universit; Misurata University; University of Portsmouth (Editura ASE, 2022-04-22)
      Research Question: How can business organizations develop accounting practices to use big data to create competitive intelligence advantages to survive during and beyond the Covid-19 conditions? Motivation: We aim to provide new accounting perspectives for using big data techniques in business organizations beyond the covid-19. Idea: We argue that the massive reduction in business capacity and operations will interpose the accounting and financial practices beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a crucial need to uncover the underlying business practices and market circumstances toward the radical shifts in business and society. Date: Our paper uses a desk study method to investigate companies' possible challenges and opportunities to use big data analytics as a survival method during and beyond the Covid-19 conditions. Tools: Critical contingencies represent one of the leading business strategies to manage the shift in customer demand and business risks. Big data can be used in this sense as a valuable intangible asset to create these critical contingencies and help a business survive beyond this pandemic. Findings: This study provides policy and practitioner implications in relation to establishing new accounting perspectives on big data analytics in the context of achieving economic sustainability for corporations during and beyond the Covid-19 pandemic. It offers new forms of trust, accountability and governance practices to integrate big data into accounting practices to create more competitive intelligence for businesses.
    • Bi-layered disulfiram-loaded fiber membranes with antibacterial properties for wound dressing

      Xie, Chenchen; Yan, Jin; Cao, Siyuan; Liu, Ri; Sun, Baishun; Xie, Ying; Qu, Kaige; Zhang, Wenxiao; Weng, Zhankun; Wang, Zuobin; et al. (Springer, 2021-10-29)
      In this study, the bi-layered disulfiram-loaded fiber membranes with the antibacterial activity and different surface wettabilities are prepared using electrospinning technology. In the application of wound dressing, the hydrophilic surface of fiber membranes is beneficial for cell adhesion and drug release to heal the wound. Meanwhile, the outside hydrophobic surface is able to block water penetration to reduce the probability of wound infection. The obtained bi-layered drug-loaded fiber membranes are composed of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) bottom surface and disulfiram (DSF)/polylactic acid (PLA) top surface. To modify the top surface wettability, the oxygen plasma modification of bi-layered membranes was carried out. The morphology, wettability, and chemical compositions of bi-layered drug-loaded fiber membranes were analyzed using the scanning electronic microscope (SEM), drop shape analysis instrument, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS). The bi-layered disulfiram-loaded membranes showed the potent antibacterial activity in vitro against both Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive). It was found that the bi-layered membranes had good biocompatibility with L929 cells. Thus, the obtained bi-layered disulfiram-loaded fiber membranes are suitable for wound dressing application.
    • Regulation of cell cycle and differentiation markers by pathogenic, non-pathogenic and opportunistic skin bacteria

      Younis, Sidra; Deeba, Farah; Fatima Saeed, Rida; Mothana, Ramzi A.; Ullah, Riaz; Faheem, Muhammad; Javed, Qamar; Blumenberg, Miroslav; National University of Medical Sciences, Pakistan; Quaid-e-Azam University; et al. (Elsevier B.V., 2021-11-02)
      Skin is the first line of defense against the physical, chemical and the biological environment. It is an ideal organ for studying molecular responses to biological infections through a variety of skin cells that specialize in immune responses. Comparative analysis of skin response to pathogenic, non-pathogenic, and commensal bacteria would help in the identification of disease specific pathways for drug targets. In this study, we investigated human breast reduction skin responses to Cutibacterium acnes (C. acnes), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), and TLR1/2 agonist using Affymetrix microarray chips. The Pam3CSK4 solution and bacterial cultures were prepared and inoculated in steel rings, that were placed on the acetone treated epidermis in a petri dish. After 24 h incubation, 8 mm punch biopsies were taken from the center of the ring, and RNA was extracted. The genome-wide expression was then analyzed using Affymetrix HG-133A gene chip microarray. We found that the C. acnes and S. aureus boosted the production of extracellular matrix components and attenuated the expression of differentiation markers. The above responses were mediated through the TLR2 pathway. Skin also responded to S. aureus and C. acnes by inducing the genes of the cell cycle machinery; this response was not TLR2-dependent. S. aureus induced, whereas C. acnes suppressed the genes associated with apoptosis; this was also not TLR2-dependent. Moreover, S. epidermis apparently did not lead to changes in gene expression. We conclude that the breast reduction skin is a very useful model to study the global gene expression in response to bacterial treatments.