• The Hong Kong Statement on Practice Research 2017: contexts and challenges of the Far East

      Sim, Timothy; Austin, Michael J.; Abdullah, Fazlin; Chan, Tak Mau Simon; Chok, Martin; Cui, Ke; Epstein, Irwin; Fisher, Mike; Joubert, Lynette; Julkunen, Ilse; et al. (SAGE Publications Inc, 2018-06-15)
      This statement on social work practice research highlights the contributions of scholars, practitioners, and conference participants in the Fourth International Conference on Practice Research (ICPR) in 2017, hosted by The Hong Kong Polytechnic University in May 2017. It focuses on the contexts and challenges of carrying out practice research in the Far East and beyond as well as raises pertinent questions about the development of practice research. It begins with a brief description of the context of social work practice research in the Far East. The second part explores the organizational and community contexts and challenges of practice research with special attention to the perspectives of practitioners. It concludes with reviewing some of the continuing challenges that will guide the program planning for the Fifth ICPR in 2020 in Melbourne, Australia, located at the crossroads between East and West.
    • Improving utility of GPU in accelerating industrial applications with user-centered automatic code translation

      Yang, Po; Dong, Feng; Codreanu, Valeriu; Williams, David; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Liu, Baoquan; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Min, Geyong; University of Bedfordshire; SURFsara; et al. (IEEE Computer Society, 2017-07-24)
      Small to medium enterprises (SMEs), particularly those whose business is focused on developing innovative produces, are limited by a major bottleneck in the speed of computation in many applications. The recent developments in GPUs have been the marked increase in their versatility in many computational areas. But due to the lack of specialist GPUprogramming skills, the explosion of GPU power has not been fully utilized in general SME applications by inexperienced users. Also, the existing automatic CPU-to-GPU code translators are mainly designed for research purposes with poor user interface design and are hard to use. Little attentions have been paid to the applicability, usability, and learnability of these tools for normal users. In this paper, we present an online automated CPU-to-GPU source translation system (GPSME) for inexperienced users to utilize the GPU capability in accelerating general SME applications. This system designs and implements a directive programming model with a new kernel generation scheme and memory management hierarchy to optimize its performance. A web service interface is designed for inexperienced users to easily and flexibly invoke the automatic resource translator. Our experiments with nonexpert GPU users in four SMEs reflect that a GPSME system can efficiently accelerate real-world applications with at least 4× and have a better applicability, usability, and learnability than the existing automatic CPU-to-GPU source translators.
    • Improving utility of GPU in accelerating industrial applications with user-centred automatic code translation

      Yang, Po; Dong, Feng; Codreanu, Valeriu; Williams, David; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Min, Geyong; University of Bedfordshire; Liverpool John Moores University; SURFsara; et al. (IEEE, 2017-07-24)
      SMEs, particularly those whose business is focused on developing innovative produces, are limited by a major bottleneck on the speed of computation in many applications. The recent developments in GPUs have been the marked increase in their versatility in many computational areas. But due to the lack of specialist GPU (Graphics processing units) programming skills, the explosion of GPU power has not been fully utilized in general SME applications by inexperienced users. Also, existing automatic CPU-to-GPU code translators are mainly designed for research purposes with poor user interface design and hard-to-use. Little attentions have been paid to the applicability, usability and learnability of these tools for normal users. In this paper, we present an online automated CPU-to-GPU source translation system, (GPSME) for inexperienced users to utilize GPU capability in accelerating general SME applications. This system designs and implements a directive programming model with new kernel generation scheme and memory management hierarchy to optimize its performance. A web service based interface is designed for inexperienced users to easily and flexibly invoke the automatic resource translator. Our experiments with non-expert GPU users in 4 SMEs reflect that GPSME system can efficiently accelerate real-world applications with at least 4x and have a better applicability, usability and learnability than existing automatic CPU-to-GPU source translators    
    • Networks of knowledge, students as producers, and politicised inquiry

      Carmichael, Patrick; Tracy, Frances; Dohn, Nina Bonderup; Jandrić, Petar; Ryberg,Thomas; de Laat, Maarten; University of Bedfordshire; Liverpool John Moores University; University of Southern Denmark; Zagreb University of Applied Sciences; et al. (Springer, 2020-03-22)
      This chapter explores the potential for the development of new learning opportunities in higher education, through students being conceptualised not as consumers, recipients or commodities, but rather as co-researchers and co-producers of knowledge. It discusses the implications of new forms of networked knowledge enabled by the emergence of semantic web and linked data technologies, and the reconceptualisation of the Internet as a ‘global data space’. These approaches have the potential to allow students to engage critically with existing data and data practices, generate new data and, perhaps more significantly, to participate in local or global knowledge networks. These activities involve not only the development of specific techno-literacies, but also broader critical digital literacies of which we offer examples and propose a number of dimensions. A critical digital literacies perspective, particularly when combined with the idea of students as co-researchers and co-producers, provides a basis for student to undertake critical and politicised inquiry as part of a broader reframing of the purposes of higher education.