• ‘Y el olor de la sangre manchaba el aire’: Tlatelolco 1521 and 1968 in José Emilio Pacheco’s ‘Lectura de los “Cantares Mexicanos”’

      Carpenter, Victoria; (Liverpool University Press, 2018-04-01)
      When Octavio Paz compared the Tlatelolco 1968 massacre to the conquest of the Aztec empire he created a foundation (and indeed, at times, the inspiration) for the view of the massacre as a symbol of a long-lasting internal conflict. This paper explores how the Tlatelolco 1968 poetry reflects (or appropriates) the 1521 texts. Are these texts used as extra metaphors of what happened in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas on 2 October, as links to the square’s infamous past, or is there a more enduring reason for the retelling of the story of the fall of Tenochtitlán? To answer these questions, I will examine four versions of José Emilio Pacheco’s poem ‘Lectura de los “Cantares Mexicanos”: Manuscrito de Tlatelolco (octubre 1968)’. The reading will be informed by the theory of habit (Bourdieu) and collective remembering and forgetting (Halbwachs and Bartlett).
    • Yielding as an ecologically sensitive and somatic practice

      Ashley, Tamara (2019-03-20)
      These yielding practices are designed to anchor your perception of nature in your senses. They enable you to focus on different senses in the natural environment and observe the emerging relationships. Most practices in this Toolkit are available as recordings, which you can listen to through your device or headphones. However, to benefit most from the sensory immersion in a natural environment that the yielding practice advocates, we recommend that you read the PDF script in advance (link below), print it, and then go outdoors with this score as your guide. Take your time with each invitation: perhaps only try 1 or 2 of the practices at first. Repetition of the practices can be helpful in observing changing perceptual and experiential relationships with nature over time.
    • ‘You want the truth? you can't handle the truth’: poetic representations of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre

      Carpenter, Victoria; York St John University (Taylor and Francis, 2015-07-03)
      The 1968 massacre of students demonstrating in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas, in the Tlatelolco district of Mexico City, has been the subject of a corpus known as la literatura de Tlatelolco, whose aim is to keep the event alive in the collective memory and to provide a true account of the massacre. This article explores poetic representations of the massacre, and seeks to establish whether ‘the truth’ about the massacre is necessary to preserve the event in the collective memory.
    • Young black males: resilience and the use of capital to transform school ‘failure’

      Wright, Cecile; Maylor, Uvanney; Becker, Sophie (Routledge, 2016-01-06)
      This article addresses the idea of ‘failure’ of young black males with respect to schooling. Perceptions of black masculinity are often linked to ‘underperformance’ in the context of school academic achievement. This article addresses how young black men, by great personal effort, recover from school ‘failure’. It explores how young black men, despite negative school experiences, see possibilities for their future and how they seek to transform school ‘failure’ into personal and educational ‘success’. Low attainment combined with permanent/temporary exclusion from school does not necessarily deter young black men from pursuing their education. This low attainment is used by some to make a renewed attempt at educational progression in a different post-school learning environment. Yosso’s concept of ‘community cultural wealth’ provides an understanding of how different forms of capital are accessed by young black men to form a ‘turnaround narrative’. This article considers the complex ways in which young black males work to transform their negative school experience. Their narratives reveal a determination to succeed and the ways in which cultivation of this determination by the family, organisational/community agents promotes a sense of possibility. However, it remains to be seen how, in the UK, the cuts to vital local services and support will impact on this sense of possibility.
    • Young British African and Caribbean men achieving educational success: disrupting deficit discourses about Black male achievement

      Wright, Cecile; Maylor, Uvanney; Pickup, Thomas; University of Bedfordshire; University of Nottingham (Routledge, 2020-10-05)
      In contrast to research that focuses on the underperformance of young Black males in the British education system, the dominant notion of this volume is educational success. By aiming to understand how young, Black—notably African and Caribbean—male education plays out in different educational spaces, this book provides new insights around intersections between, and across, different structural forces and educational contexts.
    • Young mothers in Islamic contexts: implications for social work and social development

      Hutchinson, Aisha; O'Leary, Patrick J. (SAGE, 2016-04-30)
      Social work has a particular responsibility to develop culturally and religiously appropriate practice. Early childbearing occurs in many Muslim families and can be a sensitive issue because it is often shaped by local religious teachings. Early childbearing is associated with health and social vulnerabilities. Social work has an important role to partner with local religious leaders to support this vulnerable population. There are Islamic teachings that promote the care of pregnant mothers and babies. Many of these teachings are not well understood or applied when working with Muslim communities. Implications for social work research and practice are examined.
    • Young people and police making "Marginal Gains": climbing fells, building relationships and changing police safeguarding practice

      Factor, Fiona; Ackerley, Elizabeth; University of Bedfordshire; University of Manchester (Emerald, 2019-09-05)
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe a youth work model of participatory research practice which utilises a range of methods within non-traditional research settings, highlighting the importance of trust, risk-taking and the creation of mutually respectful and non-hierarchical relationships. The paper suggests that such methods enable the development of new insights into previously intractable challenges when working with adolescents needing a safeguarding response from professionals. Design/methodology/approach The paper reflects on the challenges and successes of a project which brought police officers and young people together to develop solutions to improving safeguarding responses to young people affected by sexual violence and related forms of harm in adolescence. In particular, this paper focuses on a residential held in October 2016 in the Lake District involving 7 officers and 15 young people. Findings Despite a number of ethical challenges throughout the project, this paper makes the case that potentially high-risk participatory research projects can be supported and managed by university research centres. However, for these to be successful, staff need to work in trauma-informed ways, and possess high-level expertise in group work facilitation. Transparency, honesty, constancy and a range of different and creative activities, including mental and physical challenges, all contributed to the success of the project. Originality/value By detailing the empirical steps taken to develop, support and realise this project, this paper advances a youth work model of participatory research practice, filling an important gap within the methodological literature on participatory work with young people affected by sexual violence.
    • Young people and ‘county lines’: a contextual and social account

      Wroe, Lauren; University of Bedfordshire (Emerald, 2021-01-04)
      This paper presents an analysis of a ‘county lines’ safeguarding partnership in a large city region of England. A critical analysis of current literature and practice responses to ‘county lines’ is followed by the presentation of an analytical framework that draws on three contextual and social theories of (child) harm. This framework is applied to the partnership work to ask: are the interconnected conditions of criminal exploitation of children via ‘county lines’ understood, do interventions target the contexts of harm, and is social and institutional harm acknowledged and addressed? The analytical framework is applied to a dataset collected by the author throughout a two year study of the project. Qualitative data collected by the author and quantitative data published by the project are coded and thematically analysed in NVivo against the analytic framework. Critical tensions are surfaced in how multi-agency, child welfare practices are applied to ‘county lines’ affected young people. Generalising these findings to the child welfare sector at large, it is proposed that the contextual dynamics of child harm via ‘county lines’ must be understood in a broader sense, including how multi-agency child welfare practices contribute to the harm experienced by young people. There are limited peer-reviewed analyses of child welfare responses to ‘county lines’. This paper contributes to that limited scholarship, extending the analysis by adopting a critical analytic framework to a regional county lines project at the juncture of future national, child welfare responses to ‘county lines’.
    • Young people who sexually harm peers in groups: a rapid evidence assessment of international literature

      Latchford, Lia; Firmin, Carlene Emma; Fritz, Danielle; Hackett, Simon; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-11-18)
      This literature review was conducted to develop an evidence base on young people who sexually harm in groups, by synthesising existing literature on group harmful sexual behaviour (HSB), wider group offending and group interventions
    • Young people's self-reported experiences of sexual exploitation and sexual violence: a view from Northern Ireland

      Beckett, Helen; Schubotz, Dirk (Taylor and Francis, 2013-08-13)
      The issue of young people's experiences of sexual exploitation and sexual violence has received increasing political and media attention within recent years. However, whilst many studies have identified this to be an emerging issue of concern, the collation of prevalence data on the extent of these issues is still very much in its infancy. In this article we report on the findings of a large-scale project on the sexual exploitation of young people, undertaken in Northern Ireland from 2009 to 2011. The article primarily explores young people's self-reported experiences of sexual violence and exploitation, collated from their responses to a module of questions placed in the 2010 Young Life and Times Survey. The quantitative dataset from the survey covers both prevalence of sexually exploitative experiences and young people's reports about the type of individuals perpetrating these incidents. This dataset is illustrated and contextualised with reference to the qualitative findings from interviews with young people and professionals conducted as part of the wider sexual exploitation study. The article concludes with a consideration of the implications of the findings, with particular reference to the need for further preventative work in this field. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.
    • Youth and community approaches to preventing child sexual exploitation: South African and UK project experiences

      D'Arcy, Kate; Thomas, Roma; Wallace, Candace T. (Sage, 2018-06-14)
      This chapter brings together case studies from two pieces of research – an evaluative study in the UK (D’Arcy et al., 2015) and a participatory action research project in South Africa (Wallace, 2015). The chapter aims to provide international perspectives on youth and community approaches to empowering children, young people and their families in preventing and raising awareness of Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) and Child SexualAbuse (CSA). It highlights the potential relevance and significance of central tenets of youth and community approaches to prevention work in CSE and CSA by drawing upon the concepts of education, voluntary engagement,participation, strengths-based approaches and rights-based models of working with children and young people.
    • Youth crime and youth justice 2015–2020

      Pitts, John (National Youth Agency, 2015-05-01)
      This article considers current issues in crime and justice in the UK and how these may bear upon young people over the next five years. It looks first at the ‘crime drop’ and observes that while conventional crime is falling, cyber crime is growing exponentially and that this may impact disproportionately upon the young. It examines the data on ethnicity, crime and victimisation and concludes that young Black men face particular dangers, particularly if they find themselves caught up in the penal system. It asks whether sexual offending is increasing, as the available data suggests, or whether it is just more widely reported and investigated and it raises questions about how it is to be policed in the future. It asks whether gang crime is growing or changing and, finally, it speculates about how the major parties may deal with ‘law and order’ in the run-up to the May 2015 election.
    • Youth justice

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2017-02-06)
    • Youth justice news [April 2018]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2018-04-10)
    • Youth Justice News [April 2021]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2021-04-25)
    • Youth justice news [August 2017]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2017-08-01)
    • Youth justice news [December 2017]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2017-12-01)
    • Youth justice news [February 2019]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2019-02-18)
    • Youth justice news [January 2017]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2017-04-01)
    • Youth Justice News [January 2021]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2021-01-11)