• Addressing the needs of older adults receiving alcohol treatment during the Covid-19 pandemic: a qualitative study

      Seddon, Jennifer L.; Trevena, Paulina; Wadd, Sarah; Elliott, Lawrie; Dutton, Maureen; McCann, Michelle; Willmott, Sarah; Breslin, Julie; Glasgow Caledonian University; University of Bedfordshire (Drink Wise Age Well, 2020-12-09)
      This study aims to better understand the impact of the pandemic on older alcohol service users aged 55+ and alcohol service providers. The key aims of the study are to: 1 Explore the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown on older service users, including on their alcohol consumption. 2 Identify how alcohol services have adapted and supported older service users, and how staff experienced these changes. 3 Identify the short and long-term implications for service provision, and how service responses could be improved.
    • Factors influencing routine cognitive impairment screening in older at-risk drinkers: findings from a qualitative study in the United Kingdom

      Madoc-Jones, Iolo; Wadd, Sarah; Elliott, Lawrie; Whittaker, Anne; Adnum, Laura; Close, Ciara; Seddon, Jennifer L.; Dutton, Maureen; McCann, Michelle; Wilson, Fiona (Wiley, 2020-07-14)
      Cognitive Impairment (CI) screening is recommended for those engaged in harmful levels of alcohol use. However, there is a lack of evidence on implementation. This paper explores the barriers and facilitators to CI screening experienced across a service specifically for older drinkers. The findings draw on data gathered as part of an evaluation of a multilevel programme to reduce alcohol-related harm in adults aged 50 and over in five demonstration areas across the United Kingdom. It is based on qualitative interviews and focus groups with 14 service providers and 22 service users. Findings are presented thematically under the section headings: acceptability of screening, interpretation and making sense of screening and treatment options. It is suggested that engagement with CI screening is most likely when its fit with agency culture and its purpose is clear; where service providers have the technical skills to administer and discuss the results of screening with service users; and where those undertaking screening have had the opportunity to reflect on their own experience of being screened. Engagement with CI screening is also most likely where specific intervention pathways and engagement practices can be accessed to respond to assessed need.
    • Valuing families' preferences for drug treatment: a discrete choice experiment

      Shanahan, Marian; Seddon, Jennifer L.; Ritter, Alison; De Abreu Lourenco, Richard; University of New South Wales; University of Bedfordshire (Wiley, 2019-09-10)
      The burden on family members of those who are dependent on illicit drugs is largely unidentified despite the presence of significant negative financial, health and social impacts. This makes it difficult to provide appropriate services and support. This study aimed to assess the preferences for treatment attributes for heroin dependence among family members affected by the drug use of a relative and to obtain a measure of the intangible economic benefit. Discrete choice experiment. Data were analysed using mixed logit which accounted for repeated responses. Australia PARTICIPANTS: Eligible participants were Australian residents of 18+ years of age with a relative with problematic drug use. Complete data on 237 respondents were analysed; 21 invalid responses were deleted. Participant preference for likelihood of staying in treatment, family conflict, own health status, contact with police and monetary contribution to a charitable organisation providing treatment. All attributes were significant, and the results suggest there was a preference for longer time in treatment, less family discord, better own health status, less likelihood of their relative encountering police, and while they were willing to contribute to a charity for treatment to be available, they prefer to pay less not more. In order of relative importance, participants were willing to pay an additional $4.46 (95% CI 3.33-5.60) for treatment which resulted in an additional 1% of heroin users staying in treatment for longer than 3 months, $42.00 (95% CI 28.30-55.69) to avoid 5 days per week of family discord, $87.94 (95% CI 64.41-111.48) for treatment options that led to an improvement in their own health status, and $129.66 (95% CI 53.50-205.87) for each 1% decline in the chance of police contact. Drug treatment in Australia appears to have intangible benefits for affected family members. Families are willing to pay for treatment which reduces family discord, improves their own health, increases time in treatment and reduces contact with police. BACKGROUND AND AIMS DESIGN SETTING MEASUREMENTS FINDINGS CONCLUSIONS