• Blowing the lid off cultural exclusion: possibilities of the Mass Observation Project

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2018-03-27)
      Families with children gather together multiple generations around carefully constructed bonfires, an exaggerated check for hedgehogs and nanny lights the fire. Dad lights the fireworks, carefully placing each one, sealing the tin, standing back after lighting the touch paper and together they watch the fizzy colourful exciting bursts. Stopping to enjoy baked potatoes, parkin, treacle toffee, and run around with sparklers. The fun fills the crisp night air. The noise, like an artillery barrage fills the smoky night. But not everyone has children to hand to gain access to this special night, and for many it is a night when other people have fun. They put up with the loud intrusive bangs, and reminisce on their own lifetime of being part of, and excluded from, this special night. Stories about leisure through the life course that are presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about bonfire night (Bonfire Night 2015). Current and remembered stories are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate ‘other people’s fun’ and the effect that echoes of the past have on the 5th of November each year. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form which is used in leisure studies research, and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way. Drawing on narratives from the Mass Observation Archive in Sussex, this paper explores the thoughts and feeling of people around this mass cultural event who do not fit the cultural brief for inclusion. Some find ways to vicariously participate, others turn up the TV, grit their teeth and hang onto their pets. This research begins to explore what lies beneath these responses.
    • A radical take on co-production? community partner leadership in research

      Martikke, Susanne; Church, Andrew; Hart, Angie (Bristol University Press: Policy Press, 2018-12-19)
    • Leisure in 21st century later life

      Wiseman, T.; Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew (2018-07-19)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The narratives about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind 2012) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone 2011, Smith 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley 2008). The rich and insightful reports from the correspondents of the mass observation archive record in great detail the lives that people are living, and how they feel about them. There is not currently a grand narrative to lead us in this uncharted extended later life. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories, not based on historical generalisations, but on the carefully reported everyday lives of people that know.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life: early findings

      Wiseman, T.; Ravenscroft, Neil; Church, Andrew (2017-07-05)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The narratives about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind 2012) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone 2011, Smith 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley 2008). The rich and insightful reports from the correspondents of the mass observation archive record in great detail the lives that people are living, and how they feel about them. There is not currently a grand narrative to lead us in this uncharted extended later life. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories, not based on historical generalisations, but on the carefully reported everyday lives of people that know.
    • Leisure in 21st century later life: working with the Mass Observation Project

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2017-07-11)
      New ageing populations are emerging in the UK, people are surviving into later life in greater numbers than ever before and many of those people are healthy (ONS 2014), which is a new phenomenon. This research considers theory and research from subjects that often consider later life to be problematic, but reads them from a more optimistic perspective. Leisure research and theory, gerontology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, and UK office for National Statistics reports all contribute to creating a new perspective on later life. The stories about leisure in late life presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about everyday life from 2000-2016. Current and remembered stories about everyday life are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate everyday leisure in 21st century late life in the UK. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form which is used in leisure studies research and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way. Finding a comfortable lifestyle is an art, and taking the lead from those that have gone before is not possible for this ‘new’ cohort. So looking to the side, at peers to find out about later lives in the 21st century is one way of imagining this new phase of life. With varied stories of later life for inspiration we can begin to imagine our own later life stories.
    • Blowing the lid off cultural exclusion: constraints to participation in intergenerational celebrations

      Wiseman, T.; Church, Andrew; Ravenscroft, Neil (2018-07-12)
      Families with children gather together multiple generations around carefully constructed bonfires, an exaggerated check for hedgehogs and nanny lights the fire. Dad lights the fireworks, carefully placing each one, sealing the tin, standing back after lighting the touch paper and together they watch the fizzy colourful exciting bursts. Stopping to enjoy baked potatoes, parkin, treacle toffee, and run around with sparklers. The fun fills the crisp night air. The noise, like an artillery barrage fills the smoky night. But not everyone has children to hand to gain access to this special night, and for many it is a night when other people have fun. They put up with the loud intrusive bangs, and reminisce on their own lifetime of being part of, and excluded from, this special night. Stories about leisure through the life course that are presented in this research were constructed through immersion in the contributions of individual Mass Observation Archive correspondents writing about bonfire night (Bonfire Night 2015). Current and remembered stories are woven together using direct quotes to create stories that illustrate ‘other people’s fun’ and the effect that echoes of the past have on the 5th of November each year. Creative non-fiction is an important narrative form (Gutkind, 2006) which is used in leisure studies research (Humberstone, 2011; Smith, 2013), and aims to present qualitative findings in an engaging and emotive way (Caulley, 2008). Drawing on narratives from the Mass Observation Archive in Sussex, this paper explores the thoughts and feeling of people around this mass cultural event who do not fit the cultural brief for inclusion. Some find ways to vicariously participate, others turn up the TV, grit their teeth and hang onto their pets. This research begins to explore what lies beneath these responses.
    • Layered and linking research partnerships: learning from YOUR World Research in Ethiopia and Nepal

      Johnson, Vicky; Admassu, Anannia; Church, Andrew; Healey, Jill; Mathema, Sujeeta (Institute of Development Studies, 2019-05-01)
      This article draws on learning from the YOUR World Research project in Ethiopia and Nepal, which uses the socioecological Change‑scape framework to understand how participants in research need to be understood within a landscape of changing institutional, environmental, and political contexts. The article explores whether trustful relationships, ownership, and commitment can bring about more effective societal change through research. Through group discussion and reflective perspectives, the authors draw out possible indicators of successful partnership from the different contexts in which YOUR World Research was working. These include histories of interpersonal relationships; shared vision and motivations; building ownership; shared platforms and spaces for dialogue; and flexibility to respond to shocks and changes in context. The article suggests that whilst being realistic about the power and politics of partnership, there are mechanisms in partnership models that can help support high-quality rigorous research whilst creating impact at local, national, and international levels.
    • Memories, mementos, and memorialization of young unaccompanied Afghans navigating within Europe

      Lønning, Moa Nyamwathi; Kohli, Ravi K.S.; (Oxford University Press, 2021-09-28)
      This article considers memories, mementos, and memorialization in stories by unaccompanied young people and their journeys within Europe. It looks at their ‘navigation’ of remembering and forgetting and how this intertwines with movement and stillness. It is based on a study about Afghan males aged 15–24 years in Norway and Greece. Participants differed in terms of their backgrounds, migration projects, and their legal status. In their various circumstances, their narratives point to how memories unfold, are shared, must be negotiated, and sometimes, forgotten as they navigate towards a sense of safety and a sustainable future. They also point to how mementos may take different forms while on the move, as traces along the migration trail that have the potential to become part of the memories of others who come across them. Finally, their narratives point to practices of memorialization, and how they too are intimately connected to remembering and forgetting
    • Guest editorial: Innovation in children’s social care: from conceptualisation to improved outcomes?

      Munro, Emily; Skouteris, Helen; Newlands, Fiona; Walker, Steve; University of Bedfordshire; Monash University; Children’s Services, Leeds City Council (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2021-09-14)
    • A decade on from the summer riots

      Bateman, Tim (2021-07-27)
    • Youth Justice News [January 2021]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2021-01-11)
    • Youth Justice News [April 2021]

      Bateman, Tim (Sage, 2021-04-25)
    • On (not) learning from self-neglect safeguarding adult reviews

      Preston-Shoot, Michael (Emerald Group Holdings Ltd., 2021-07-09)
      Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to update the core data set of self-neglect safeguarding adult reviews (SARs) and accompanying thematic analysis. It also explores whether lessons are being learned from the findings and recommendations of an increasing number of reviews on self-neglect cases. Design/methodology/approach: Further published reviews are added to the core data set, mainly drawn from the websites of safeguarding adults boards (SABs). Thematic analysis is updated using the domains used previously. The domains and the thematic analysis are grounded in the evidence-based model of good practice, reported in this journal previously. Findings: Familiar findings emerge from the thematic analysis and reinforce the evidence-base of good practice with individuals who self-neglect and for policies and procedures with which to support those practitioners working with such cases. Multiple exclusion homelessness and alcohol misuse are prominent. Some SABs are having to return to further cases of self-neglect to review, inviting scrutiny of what is (not) being learned from earlier findings and recommendations. Research limitations/implications: The national database of reviews commissioned by SABs remains incomplete. The Care Act 2014 does not require publication of reports but only a summary of findings and recommendations in SAB annual reports. National Health Service Digital annual data sets do not enable the identification of reviews by types of abuse and neglect. However, the first national analysis of SARs has found self-neglect to be the most prominent type of abuse and/or neglect reviewed. Drawing together the findings builds on what is known about the components of effective practice, and effective policy and organisational arrangements for practice. Practical implications: Answering the question “why” remains a significant challenge for SARs. The findings confirm the relevance of the evidence-base for effective practice but SARs are limited in their analysis of what enables and what obstructs the components of best practice. Greater explicit use of research and other published SARs might assist with answering the “why” question. Greater scrutiny is needed of the impact of the national legal, policy and financial context within which adult safeguarding is situated. Originality/value: The paper extends the thematic analysis of available reviews that focus on study with adults who self-neglect, further reinforcing the evidence base for practice. Propositions are explored, concerned with whether learning is being maximised from the process of case review.
    • The neoconservative party, or conservatism without tradition?

      Hoctor, Tom (Wiley, 2021-07-15)
      This article argues that the Conservative Party finds itself in a period of ideological crisis. The last significant period of intellectual realignment in the party led to the dominance of Hayekian market theory as a structuring logic for government. Under Boris Johnson, this economic logic is challenged by the political logic of neoconservatism, which restores the political through appeals to authority, hierarchy and quite particular articulations of the nature of the (national) community. To demonstrate this tension, the article examines how Brexit and the ‘levelling-up’ agenda can be understood as structured by this division between the economic and the political. Both of these logics are incompatible with older, traditional forms of conservatism and whichever is ultimately successful, this signals a major shift in the character of British conservatism and potentially ushers in a new era of conservatism without tradition.
    • Assessment and intervention planning for young people at risk of extra-familial harm: a practice guide

      Owens, Rachael; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2019-03-07)
      This document is designed to support practitioners to undertake assessments which are holistic in nature – taking into account both the context of children’s experiences within their family home and in other social spaces.
    • Evidence based approaches to violence reduction: a discussion paper

      Davey, Peter; Bath, Rachel; Staniforth, Rachel; Firmin, Carlene Emma; MacFarlane, Colin; Sebire, Jackie; Cestaro, David; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2021-03-30)
      This document helps practitioners to understand Public Health, Problem-solving and Contextual Safeguarding approaches as three complementary evidence-based approaches to violence reduction.
    • Towards a contextual response to peer-on-peer abuse: research and resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Curtis, George; Fritz, Danielle; Olaitan, Paul; Latchford, Lia; Lloyd, Jenny; Larasi, Ikamara; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-06-20)
      This report chronicles the findings and resources on peer-on-peer abuse generated by the MsUnderstood Partnership over the past three years, with specific reference to the tools and knowledge created alongside professionals through local site work. The programme of work was funded by the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, the Samworth Foundation and Trust for London.
    • Young people who sexually harm peers in groups: a rapid evidence assessment of international literature

      Latchford, Lia; Firmin, Carlene Emma; Fritz, Danielle; Hackett, Simon; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-11-18)
      This literature review was conducted to develop an evidence base on young people who sexually harm in groups, by synthesising existing literature on group harmful sexual behaviour (HSB), wider group offending and group interventions
    • Safeguarding adolescents: a survey of London professionals

      Shuker, Lucie; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2017-11-16)
      This report presents the findings of a survey of 120 London-based professionals from a range of agencies, on their views and experiences of safeguarding adolescents in the capital. It was undertaken as part of a programme of work for the London Safeguarding Adolescents Steering Group (LSASG) and will inform the development of a new chapter on safeguarding adolescents in the London Child Protection Procedures.
    • Safeguarding during adolescence: the relationship between contextual safeguarding, complex safeguarding and transitional safeguarding

      Firmin, Carlene Emma; Horan, Jayne; Holmes, Dez; Hopper, Gail; Contextual Safeguarding Network (Contextual Safeguarding Network, 2016-01-09)
      Briefing on the relationship between Contextual Safeguarding, Complex Safeguarding and Transitional Safeguarding