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dc.contributor.authorJohnstone, James A.en
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Gerwyn T.G.en
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Andrew C.S.en
dc.contributor.authorFord, Paul A.en
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Timen
dc.contributor.authorDuffield, Roben
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Danen
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Justin D.en
dc.contributor.authorGarrett, Andrew T.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T12:31:57Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T12:31:57Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-08
dc.identifier.citationJohnstone JA, Hughes G, Mitchell AC, Ford PA, Watson T, Duffield R, Gordon D, Roberts JD, Garrett AT (2017) 'Accelerometery and heart rate responses of professional fast-medium bowlers in one-day and multi-day cricket', Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 16, pp.311-317.en
dc.identifier.issn1303-2968
dc.identifier.pmid28912647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622501
dc.description.abstractThe physical demands of fast-medium bowling are increasingly being recognised, yet comparative exploration of the differing demands between competitive formats (i.e. one-day [OD] versus multi-day [MD] matches) remain minimal. The aim of this study was to describe in-match physiological profiles of professional fast-medium bowlers from England across different versions of competitive matches using a multivariable wearable monitoring device. Seven professional cricket fast-medium bowlers wore the Bioharness (TM) monitoring device during matches, over three seasons (>80 hours in-match). Heart Rate (HR) and Acceleromety (ACC) was compared across match types (OD, MD) and different in-match activity states (Bowling, Between over bowling, Fielding). Peak acceleration during OD bowling was significantly higher in comparison to MD cricket ([OD vs. MD] 234.1 +/- 57.9 vs 226.6 +/- 32.9 ct.episode(-1), p < 0.05, ES = 0.11-0.30). Data for ACC were also higher during OD than MD fielding activities (p < 0.01, ES = 0.11-.30). OD bowling stimulated higher mean HR responses (143 +/- 14 vs 137 +/- 16 beats.min(-1), p < 0.05, ES = 0.21) when compared to MD matches. This increase in OD cricket was evident for both between over (129 +/- 9 vs 120 +/- 13 beats.min(-1), p < 0.01, ES = 0.11-0.50) and during fielding (115 +/- 12 vs 106 +/- 12 beats.min(-1), p < 0.01, ES = 0.36) activity. The increased HR and ACC evident in OD matches suggest greater acute physical loads than MD formats. Therefore, use of wearable technology and the findings provided give a valuable appreciation of the differences in match loads, and thus required physiological preparation and recovery in fast-medium bowlers.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJOURNAL SPORTS SCIENCE & MEDICINEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jssm.org/hf.php?id=jssm-16-311.xmlen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectin-match dataen
dc.subjectphysiological profilesen
dc.subjectwearable monitoringen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.subjectcricketen
dc.titleAccelerometery and heart rate responses of professional fast-medium bowlers in one-day and multi-day cricketen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAnglia Ruskin Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of San Franciscoen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentBritish Olympic Associationen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Technology Sydneyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Hullen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Science and Medicineen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5592281
dc.date.updated2018-02-16T12:06:05Z
html.description.abstractThe physical demands of fast-medium bowling are increasingly being recognised, yet comparative exploration of the differing demands between competitive formats (i.e. one-day [OD] versus multi-day [MD] matches) remain minimal. The aim of this study was to describe in-match physiological profiles of professional fast-medium bowlers from England across different versions of competitive matches using a multivariable wearable monitoring device. Seven professional cricket fast-medium bowlers wore the Bioharness (TM) monitoring device during matches, over three seasons (>80 hours in-match). Heart Rate (HR) and Acceleromety (ACC) was compared across match types (OD, MD) and different in-match activity states (Bowling, Between over bowling, Fielding). Peak acceleration during OD bowling was significantly higher in comparison to MD cricket ([OD vs. MD] 234.1 +/- 57.9 vs 226.6 +/- 32.9 ct.episode(-1), p < 0.05, ES = 0.11-0.30). Data for ACC were also higher during OD than MD fielding activities (p < 0.01, ES = 0.11-.30). OD bowling stimulated higher mean HR responses (143 +/- 14 vs 137 +/- 16 beats.min(-1), p < 0.05, ES = 0.21) when compared to MD matches. This increase in OD cricket was evident for both between over (129 +/- 9 vs 120 +/- 13 beats.min(-1), p < 0.01, ES = 0.11-0.50) and during fielding (115 +/- 12 vs 106 +/- 12 beats.min(-1), p < 0.01, ES = 0.36) activity. The increased HR and ACC evident in OD matches suggest greater acute physical loads than MD formats. Therefore, use of wearable technology and the findings provided give a valuable appreciation of the differences in match loads, and thus required physiological preparation and recovery in fast-medium bowlers.


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