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dc.contributor.authorFinlay, K. A.
dc.contributor.authorHearn, J.H.
dc.contributor.authorChater, Angel M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-01T10:15:06Z
dc.date.available2021-08-24T00:00:00Z
dc.date.available2021-09-01T10:15:06Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-24
dc.identifier.citationFinlay KA, Hearn JH, Chater A (2021) 'Grieving a disrupted biography: an interpretative phenomenological analysis exploring barriers to the use of mindfulness after neurological injury or impairment', BMC psychology, 9 (1), 124en_US
dc.identifier.issn2050-7283
dc.identifier.pmid34429164
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40359-021-00628-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/625093
dc.description.abstractMindfulness has demonstrated strong utility for enhancing self-management and health outcomes in chronic illness. However, sensation-focused mindfulness techniques may not be appropriate for clinical populations with neurological injury. This study aimed to identify how expert mindfulness teachers with sensory loss/impairment naturalistically adapt and experience mindfulness. We aimed to highlight the rationale for and barriers to mindfulness practice when living with sensory loss. A qualitative, semi-structured interview design was used, analysed via Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Eight (5 females, 3 males) mindfulness teachers with neurological injury were recruited via a national registry of Mindfulness for Health teachers. Interviews (range: 50-93 min) were completed, transcribed verbatim and analysed idiographically for descriptive, linguistic and conceptual themes, before a cross-case analysis was completed. Two superordinate themes were identified: (1) Overcoming a disrupted biography; and (2) Proactive self-management. These themes considered the challenge of reconciling, through grief, a past health status with the present reality of living with sensory loss due to Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis or Functional Neurological Disorder. Mindfulness was experienced as a method by which proactive choices could be made to maintain control and autonomy in health, reducing perceptions of suffering, psychological distress, cognitive reactivity and rumination. Mindfulness was found to support the self-management of health after neurological injury/impairment. Mindfulness meditation presented an initial challenge as trauma and grief processes were (re-)activated during mindfulness sessions. However, mindfulness was found to support the resolution of these grief processes and encourage adaptive approach-based coping and acceptance of health and neurological impairment/injury.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Centralen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://bmcpsychology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40359-021-00628-0en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8386048/en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectinterviewsen_US
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectmental processesen_US
dc.subjectgriefen_US
dc.subjectneurological rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectSubject Categories::C800 Psychologyen_US
dc.titleGrieving a disrupted biography: an interpretative phenomenological analysis exploring barriers to the use of mindfulness after neurological injury or impairmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2050-7283
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Readingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentManchester Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_US
dc.identifier.journalBMC psychologyen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8386048
dc.date.updated2021-09-01T09:48:22Z
dc.description.notegold open access


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